苏州半永久纹绣培训学校

苏州半永久培训

August, 2019

Cahill relives World Cup glory to down Japan

Socceroos star Tim Cahill relived his 2006 World Cup heroics with two second half goals against Japan to ensure Australia ended their qualifying campaign for South Africa 2010 in triumph.

南宁桑拿

An Australian team missing numerous first-choice players won 2-1 at the MCG on Wednesday night, meaning they went unbeaten through the eight games of their final phase of qualifying and stayed ahead of Japan at the top of their group to earn Asian bragging rights.

Full coverage: The World Game

Cahill, who scored the first two goals in Australia’s World Cup history to spark a famous 3-1 comeback victory over Japan in Germany in 2006, was again the shining light for the Socceroos against the Blue Samurai.

Coach Pim Verbeek lauded his players and Cahill in particular, who scored a brilliant header in the 59th minute to erase a 1-0 halftime deficit, then scored the winner in the 76th.

“Timmy is a great player, If you see the work he is doing for the team, defensively, always supporting the strikers, so dangerous in the penalty box,” Verbeek said.

“The first goal was fantastic, what a great goal that was.

“It’s fantastic for the team to have a player like that.”

While both sides were already guaranteed World Cup qualification before Wednesday night’s match, Cahill’s second half heroics gave an MCG crowd of 69,238 plenty to cheer about.

Verbeek said the team had also sent a “statement to the rest of Asia and probably the rest of the world” by topping their qualification group by five points.

There had been precious few moments for the green and gold army to cheer before the break, with Japan’s Tulio Tanaka scoring in the 40th minute.

It broke a seven-game streak of clean sheets for Socceroos’ goalkeeper Mark Schwarzer, who had spent his previous 670 minutes in goal without conceding.

But the rare blot on their defensive copybook stirred the Socceroos into life after the break and they attacked constantly in the opening stages of the second half, leading to Cahill’s breakthrough.

“I’m very proud of the players,” Verbeek said.

“At the end of a very long and tough season they still had the power and the courage to fight back from 1-0 down in the first half.

“Great goals of course from Timmy. I think the players did very well until the last second.”

Cahill leapt above two Japanese defenders at the left side of the box to connect with a long-range Vince Grella free kick for the first goal.

It seemed to inspire him to press even harder, getting onto the end of several promising attacking moves in the following minutes.

The winner came when a Nicky Carle corner kick from the right side floated over a pack of players in the box and Cahill, lurking at the back, got enough of his right leg to the ball to send it home.

It was his 16th goal in 33 internationals and he was later given a huge ovation as he walked to the bench in the 86th minute, having once again lifted Australia to a comeback victory over Japan.

Footballers join Iran protests

Iranian footballers appeared at a World Cup qualifier in Seoul wearing green armbands in support of defeated presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi as fresh rallies were held in Tehran.

南宁桑拿

Tens of thousands of supporters of defeated presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi took part in what was billed as a “silent” protest rally, marching through central Tehran, witnesses said.

Wearing green wrist- and head-bands in the colour of Mousavi’s campaign, the demonstrators carried placards accusing re-elected President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of having “stolen” their votes in Friday’s poll.

It was the fifth successive day of protests over the disputed presidential election and was called by Mr Mousavi.

Footballers use World Cup match to protest

Iranian footballers used their televised World Cup qualifying match against South Korea to stage their own protest.

About six footballers, including the captain, appeared on the field wearing green armbands in support of defeated presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi.

The news is a blow for President Mahmoud Ahamdinejad, who is closely associated with Iran’s national football squad and reportedly loans his presidential plane to the team to travel to matches.

Crackdown intensifies

The Iranian authorities threatened legal action against websites which publish material that “creates tensions” and issued a new warning to the foreign media, already facing tight restrictions on their work.

The media watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF) said a dozen Iranian journalists and bloggers have been arrested and many others have gone into hiding.

Supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khameini said he would consider a partial recount after the opposition held mass protests over what it charges was blatant rigging of the election that gave Ahmadinejad another four-year term.

In defiance of an official ban, Mousavi himself called for marches and a day of mourning on Thursday for protesters slain in the post-election clashes.

And he repeated his demand for the results of what he branded a “shameful fraud” to be annulled and a new vote called, in a statement on his movement’s website.

Calls on Iran to release prisoners

Later on Wednesday, he and former reformist president Mohammad Khatami issued a joint letter urging the Iranian authorities to release those arrested in recent days and end the violence against their supporters.

“We ask you to take all the necessary measures to put an end to today’s worrying situation, to stop the violent actions against people and to free those arrested,” said the letter, again published on his website.

Addressed to judiciary chief Ayatollah Mahmoud Hashemi Shahroudi, it denounced violent actions and provocations against peaceful protestors and attacks against students and their halls of residence.

At least seven killed

At least seven people have been killed and many more wounded in clashes, with protests reported not only in Tehran but also other major cities after an election that has exposed deep divisions in the oil-rich nation.

Ahmadinejad remained defiant, saying his landslide victory in Friday’s vote showed faith in his government of “honesty and service to the people.”

Khamenei, who has the final say on all matters of state, said he was asking the Guardians Council, a 12-member body made up of jurists and clerics, to examine the complaints of irregularities.

The council said it had invited Ahmadinejad’s three challengers to set out their grievances on Saturday.

Supporters of Ahmadinejad and Mousavi had staged rival rallies on Tuesday, each calling out hundreds of thousands of people on to the streets of Tehran.

Foreign media now banned

Foreign media were banned from covering the demonstrations under tough new restrictions aimed at keeping them off the streets, but Iranian newspapers published pictures.

The authorities have warned they will nip in the bud any “velvet revolution” and have rounded up scores of people in Tehran and other cities, including prominent reformists close to former president Khatami.

Reformist sources said that several more leading figures were arrested on Wednesday, including Mohammad Atrianfar, a confidante of former president Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, and prominent analyst and journalist Saeed Laylaz.

In a sign of the tensions within the regime, the crackdown drew criticism from some senior conservatives, notably parliament speaker Ali Larijani who spoke out against an attack on students at Tehran university.

The authorities issued a new warning to the foreign media, saying some outlets had become the “mouthpiece of the rioters’ movement.”

Call for a day of mourning in Iran

Iran’s opposition is set to hold marches and a day of mourning today for slain protesters as they keep up pressure on the authorities over the disputed presidential election in the country’s biggest crisis since the 1979 revolution.

南宁桑拿

In defiance of an official ban, defeated presidential candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi called upon his supporters to take the streets again and hold a day mourning for protesters slain in the post-election clashes, in a statement published on his movement’s website.

Tens of thousands of Mousavi’s supporters took part Wednesday in what was billed as a “silent” protest rally, marching through central Tehran, witnesses said.

Wearing green wrist- and head-bands in the colour of Mousavi’s campaign, the demonstrators carried placards accusing re-elected President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of having “stolen” their votes in Friday’s poll.

Iranian state television broadcast brief footage of the rally.

Grappling with the biggest wave of public anger in three decades of Islamic rule, Iranian authorities lashed out at enemy “plots”, hauling in foreign ambassadors and rounding up scores of reformists.

Officials threatened legal action against websites which publish material that “creates tensions” and issued a new warning to the foreign media, already facing tight restrictions on their work.

The media watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF) said a dozen Iranian journalists and bloggers have been arrested and many others have gone into hiding.

Supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khameini said he would consider a partial recount after the opposition held mass protests over what it charges was blatant rigging of the election that gave Ahmadinejad another four-year term.

But on Wednesday Mousavi repeated his demand for the results of the election, which he branded a “shameful fraud”, to be annulled and a new vote called.

Later on Wednesday, he and former reformist president Mohammad Khatami issued a joint letter urging the Iranian authorities to release those arrested in recent days and end the violence against their supporters.

“We ask you to take all the necessary measures to put an end to today’s worrying situation, to stop the violent actions against people and to free those arrested,” said the letter, again published on his website.

Addressed to judiciary chief Ayatollah Mahmoud Hashemi Shahroudi, it denounced violent actions and provocations against peaceful protestors and attacks against students and their halls of residence.

At least seven people have been killed and many more wounded in clashes, with protests reported not only in Tehran but also other major cities after an election that has exposed deep divisions in the oil-rich nation.

Ahmadinejad remained defiant, saying his landslide victory in Friday’s vote showed faith in his government of “honesty and service to the people.”

Khamenei, who has the final say on all matters of state, said he was asking the Guardians Council, a 12-member body made up of jurists and clerics, to examine the complaints of irregularities.

The council said it had invited Ahmadinejad’s three challengers to set out their grievances on Saturday.

Supporters of Ahmadinejad and Mousavi had staged rival rallies on Tuesday, each calling out hundreds of thousands of people on to the streets of Tehran.

Foreign media were banned from covering the demonstrations under tough new restrictions aimed at keeping them off the streets, but Iranian newspapers published pictures.

The authorities have warned they will nip in the bud any “velvet revolution” and have rounded up scores of people in Tehran and other cities, including prominent reformists close to former president Khatami.

Reformist sources said that several more leading figures were arrested on Wednesday, including Mohammad Atrianfar, a confidante of former president Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, and prominent analyst and journalist Saeed Laylaz.

In a sign of the tensions within the regime, the crackdown drew criticism from some senior conservatives, notably parliament speaker Ali Larijani who spoke out against an attack on students at Tehran university.

The authorities issued a new warning to the foreign media, saying some outlets had become the “mouthpiece of the rioters’ movement.”

The foreign ministry called in Swiss ambassador Livia Leu Agosti, who represents US interests in Iran amid a three-decade-old rupture in relations, to protest against what it called “interfering remarks” by US officials, state television reported.

US President Barack Obama has voiced “deep concerns” about the aftermath of the election, although he added: “It is not productive, given the history of US-Iranian relations, to be seen as meddling.”

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Analysis: ‘Rigged vote? Hard to find evidence’

Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s election victory is disbelieved by hundreds of thousands of Iranians who have poured onto Tehran’s streets in protest, but experts say hard evidence of vote rigging is elusive.

南宁桑拿

Since the government handed the incumbent president a landslide win over opposition candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi hours after Friday’s vote, Tehran has been convulsed by protests unseen since the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

Outside Iran, debate over the election result is split down largely political lines.

Former US presidential candidate John McCain, a conservative, has insisted he is “sure” the elections in Iran were rigged. With equal ferocity leftist Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez has lambasted “foreign efforts” to discredit an “historic” election.

But with few independent observers on hand to witness the vote, analysts warn there is little evidence of a smoking gun of electoral fraud, or evidence that would affirm a fair vote.

Statisticians, pollsters and Iran experts have been poring over the results for hints of vote-rigging, or the possibility that the controversial president is backed by around 63 percent of voters.

Ken Ballen, president of the Washington-based Terror Free Future think tank, three weeks ago conducted a rare country-wide poll by phone of 1,001 people to gauge Iranians’ voting intentions.

According to Ballen it is not obvious from that poll that the results of the election were rigged. “At that time Ahmadinejad was ahead by two to one. Is it plausible that he won the election? Yes.”

The survey showed that 34 percent of Iranians intended to vote for Ahmadinejad. Mousavi was the choice of just 14 percent of respondents.

But Ballen cautioned against concluding that the vote was fair.

The poll result fell far short of Ahmadinejad’s margin of victory, and 27 percent of Iranians surveyed were still undecided at the time the survey was taken. “Anything could have changed,” Ballen said.

Mousavi supporters point to the amazingly quick tallying of millions of hand-counted ballots and the Ahmadinejad’s surprise win in Mousavi’s home town, Tabriz, as proof positive of foul play.

Mousavi is from Iran’s Azeri minority, so voters in his native region in East Azerbaijan province were expected to back him to the hilt, according to Ali Alfoneh, an Iran expert at the American Enterprise Institute.

Instead official results showed Ahmadinejad won the town and Mousavi’s tally across the province was a modest 42 percent.

But Ballen’s poll indicated only 16 percent of Azeri Iranians would vote for Mousavi, against 31 percent of Azeris who claimed they would vote for Ahmadinejad.

Walter Mebane, a University of Michigan professor, has been examining the election results using statistical and computational tools to detect fraud, a method he describes as “election forensics.”

Comparing 366 district results with those from the 2005 elections, Mebane concluded that the “substantial core” of local results were in line with the basic statistical trends.

“In 2009 Ahmadinejad tended to do best in towns where his support in 2005 was highest, and he tended to do worst in towns were turnout surged the most.”

But Mebane said data released by the Iranian authorities was not detailed enough to say whether the vote was rigged or not.

“The vote counts I see recorded here do connect to reality to some extent, but in no way do I think that any of this analysis rules out the possibility of manipulation,” he told AFP.

Mebane pointed out that trends would still ring true if the government simply inflated Ahmadinejad’s vote by a fixed percentage, perhaps offsetting it against deflated opposition tallies.

With half a million people on the streets, proof of such a falsification could spell the difference between a call for justice and a revolution, according to Alfoneh.

“If the system totally fails to provide documentation that this is not fraud, that is something that is going to radicalize the protesters,” Alfoneh said.

9/11 rescue dog cloned

Five clones of a search and rescue dog which helped locate people trapped in the rubble of the 9/11 attacks were have been presented to their predecessor’s handler.

南宁桑拿

James Symington, a former Canadian police officer, choked back tears as he took possession of five puppies cloned from his beloved German shepherd named Trakr, who died earlier this year.

The decision to clone Trakr came after the animal won a competition to find the world’s most “cloneworthy” dog which was organised organised by Californian firm BioArts International.

Mr Symington says he hopes the puppies — Trustt, Valor, Prodigy, Solace and Deja Vu – will follow Trakr’s footsteps.

“We’re here to celebrate that Trakr’s legacy lives on in these five beautiful puppies,” he says.

“If they have the same attributes Trakr did, then hopefully they’ll develop into world class search and rescue dogs.”

Trakr saved lives

Mr Symington and Trakr were one of the first K9 search and rescue teams on the site of the World Trade Center collapse, commonly referred to as Ground Zero.

Trakr worked non-stop for almost 48 hours and found last human survivor to be rescued from the rubble.

“Trakr was an extraordinary search and rescue dog. His work at Ground Zero was the culmination of his career,” Mr Symington says.

An exact replica of Trakr

Mr Symington says that one member of his new litter — Trustt — was an exact replica of Trakr.

“The physical similarities are uncanny,” Mr he says.

“He’s the spitting image of the Trakr that I first met in 1995. He has exactly the same markings, the way he moves, everything. Very alert, very intelligent and intuitive.

“I respect that cloning’s not for everyone. But there are few dogs that are born with extraordinary abilities and Trakr was one of those dogs,” he says.

“I look forward to the day that these puppies can follow in Trakr’s footsteps and play an important role in other rescues, like Trakr did.”

Cloning still too expensive

BioArts International, which says it offers the world’s first commercial dog cloning service, partnered with South Korea’s SooAm Biotech Research Foundation to clone Trakr.

BioArts International chief executive Lou Hawthorne says canine cloning would remain beyond the reach of ordinary pet lovers, with cloned dogs costing an average 144,000 dollars each.

Mr Hawthorne defended the right of people to clone their dogs instead of obtaining new pets from rescue shelters.

“I think 99 percent of the time people should get their pets from shelters,” he says.

“But can we agree though that one percent of the time if you have a one in a million dog and you have the money to pay for it, you should be able to go to either a breeder or a cloner?”